Palestinian Superstitions: Part 5 of series

Today we resume the already-popular The World’s Superstitions series, traveling all the way to the Middle East and bringing back a list of Palestinian superstitions! Oh, btw, I have decided that it is best to continue cultural tidbits posts on  Mondays and generalizing this series *wink* also, that leaves the rest of the week for fresh posts about other tales from around the world. What do you think? Any feedback is appreciated!

Palestinian superstitions

Want to be guarded off evil at all times? Keep reading

* “If you use clothes in reverse your stomach will ache”

* “If you deny food to a pregnant woman you will get a sty in the eye”

* As the French, according to Palestinian superstitions, when you feel your ears are buzzing, someone is talking to you, maybe even from far away =)

* According to some Palestinians, they remember that when they were young, their mothers would tell them not to wear wet -shirts, as they could cause tummy aches as well!

* If you say something like “this has never happened to me!” you must knock on…a head! According to many Palestinians, any action in the West that would prompt a “knock on wood” reaction would prompt a “knock on someone’s head” reaction. Funny, no?

* Thought being a lefty was bad enough elsewhere in the world? Well my lefty friends, you are not spared in Palestine: They believe that if you enter a new place by stepping in with your left foot first, it’s bad omen!

* Love cherries? Don’t eat them with seeds – or else you will get appendicitis!

* See a black cat or walk under a ladder? Yes, you guessed it: Bad luck to you my friend!

* Got the hiccups? Oh, that means someone somewhere has mentioned your name! For the good or the bad? We don’t know that much!

* Keep those slippers of yours capsized at all times – Palestinian superstitions say that not doing so makes them bad omens.

* Want to be guarded off evil at all times? Then always wear a Khamsa (Hamza) pendant (picture provided above)

That shall be all for Palestinian superstitions! Stay tuned as tomorrow I’ll have a fresh entry including tips on how to dress in a certain country (you’ll find out tomorrow!) and of course, next Monday we’ll be discovering cultural tidbits of a whole new country! By the by, if there is a particular country you would like me to research, tell me in your response so I take it into consideration! (Hint: I will probably write about every country I am provided *wink*)

Previous featured countries:
Puerto Rico
India
France
Australia

Know any other Palestinian superstitions? Share in a comment below!

Australian superstitions: Part 4 of series

And today we resume the already-popular The World’s Superstitions series, traveling all the way to the South Pacific and bringing back a list of Australian superstitions!

* See a pin, let it lay? You will have bad luck all day. See a pin, pick it up? You will have good luck!

* Remember how Puerto Rico has the Chupacabra? According to Australian superstitions, Aussies have the Bunyip! While the Chupacabra viciously eats all animals in sight around bushes, the Bunyip lives in the water and may eat humans as well!

Australian superstitions, the Bunyip

the Bunyip

* Never open an unbrella inside the house

* Like Puerto Ricans, Indians, and the French, Aussies believe that walking under a ladder is bad luck!

* Throw those long-term plans through the window. Why? Not only do they “tempt” Fate, but preparing for the future actually brings bad omen! They might not work out anyway, Aussies say, so don’t have them.

* Always be the best person you can be. This alone will keep evil forces at bay. In fact, to Aussies, doing your personal best is the equivalent of “knocking on wood”!

* Little accident at the table, spilled some salt? Beware! You must throw some of it over your left shoulder or else it will bring you bad luck.

* Look at the sky. What’s its color? “Red in the morning fisherman’s warning; red at night fisherman’s delight”

* Broke a mirror? Oh no, SEVEN years of bad luck!! Interestingly, in Puerto Rico, it means seven years of bad luck in love

That shall be all for Australian superstitions! Stay tuned as tomorrow we’ll be discovering the superstitions of a whole new country! By the by, if there is a particular country you would like me to research, tell me in your response so I take it into consideration! (Hint: I will probably write about every country I am provided *wink*)

Previous featured countries:
Puerto Rico
India
France

Know more Australian superstitions? Share them in a comment below!

French superstitions: Part 3 of World’s Superstitions series

So we already know what the Puerto Ricans and Indians fear and/or even wish for. Today, we travel to Europe and learn about French superstitions!

* Want some good ol’ luck? Then step on poop with your left foot. Another thing you could do for good omen is hang a horseshoe upside down over a doorway. I’m not quite sure whether I want to try the former…

* Want to avoid the bad luck? Then, instead of fearing Friday the 13th, fear the guest count 13. Yes, that means no 13 people around your table at any given time.  According to French superstitions, you should never invite 13 people, or any number close to it, because you might still end up with 13 guests anyway (and some bad luck as a result)

* As in Puerto Rico, India and possibly many other countries, it is part of French superstitions that a black cat walking by you is bad omen.

French superstitions, polka dot dress

Polka dot dress = French superstitions!? Keep reading

* Always use a lighter or a match when lighting your prayer candle at church. Never use another candle to do so, as you would be “transferring” the “strength” of your prayer to that other candle, weakening your petition to God!

* Housewives: According to French superstitions, you should never iron your hubby’s pants with a belt on or else he will have sore kidneys (1. I’m not sure why someone would iron pants with a belt on anyway  2. Do the French men really suffer of sore kidneys so much that they want to blame it on their wives or something!?)

* Are your ears buzzing? Then someone is talking to you, maybe even from far away.

* Housewarming? Then make sure your movers (or strong friends) move in your table first. It will bring good fortune to your new place 🙂

* Ouch, elbow bump! Don’t worry, as French superstitions say this means good news for you! In form of a present 😉

* Wear a polka dot dress on New Year’s Day (January 1st) for prosperity for the rest of the year.

* Saw a spider in the evening? Might have brought a good scream, but also good luck at least!

Ok, that’s it for French superstitions! Stay tuned as Saturday we are discovering the superstitions of a whole new country! By the by, if there is a particular country you would like me to research, tell me in your response so I take it into consideration! (Hint: I will probably write about every country I am provided *wink*)

Previous featured countries:
Puerto Rico
India

Know more French superstitions? Share them in a comment below!

Indian superstitions: Part 2 of World Superstitions series

The superstitions of today’s country could, quite frankly, make up a book bigger than the Bhagavat Ghita. Still, on the second part of my new The World’s Superstitions series, I try to show you a glimpse of this long list. Ladies and gentlemen, it is Indian superstitions time today!

* As in many eastern countries, using your left hand to do pretty much anything is quite offensive. Why? Because it is typically used to, umm, wipe off after doing no.2 in the bathroom. Thus, you must refrain from eating, giving or taking anything with you left hand. Sorry, lefties!

* According to Indian superstitions, a sack full of rice will be “spoilt” if touched by a woman during her period. This also applies if the woman touches it after having sex. In fact, throughout different religions and other parts of the world, a woman on her period of after having sex is considered unclean.

* If a cat walks by you, STOP! Let it cross first. Otherwise, bad omen for you!

* But hey, not all cat events are created equal. Any pregnant cats around you? Make sure you are present during the birth of those cute little kittens! Why? According to Indian superstitions, it is good luck to see a cat giving birth!

* Many things are considered sacred in India, but here’s a mini list: Cows, Banyan, Ashoka, and Coconut trees

* For an unexplained reason, east is the preferred direction to face when performing virtually any activity, including sitting facing east at the office!

Indian superstitions photo

“Give Me My Arrows And Give Me My Bow” (Sheet music) by Samuel Lover, New York: Firth, Pond and Co. (1848)

* According to Indian superstitions, seeing someone yawning indicates that someone is thinking about you or remembering you. Aww 🙂

* Ladies and lads: No shaving on Mondays, no hair washing on Thursdays. Or else you’re doomed. Yes, bad omen for you again!

* Doing charity or volunteer work? Or you are simply starting a new business or wanting a fresh start on something? Don’t book Tuesdays or Saturdays. Yeah, no Saturdays! Or else…doomed!

* New moon tonight? Bad night! Ill omen! Ahhh!

* This one made me smile: According to Indian superstitions, walking under a ladder is bad omen, just like in Puerto Rico. My mother was right!

* Want good luck to dwell in your home forever? Then never sweep at night.

* Talking about Lakshmi (good luck), turn on all the lights in your home if you want it to pay a visit =)

* Right eye twitching is good for men, left eye twitching is good for women. Why? I honestly don’t know. Good luck in love life maybe?

* Want a sort of premonition when something bad is about to happen? A dog wailing is a sign.

* Tons of Indian superstitions associated with lizards. Heck, my fellow tropical islanders, seems like we are inevitably doomed!

Ok, long enough! Gotta keep it fair and more or less equal in length to those of other countries =) Stay tuned as tomorrow we are discovering the superstitions of a whole new country! By the by, if there is a particular country you would like me to research, tell me in your response so I take it into consideration! (Hint: I will probably write about every country I am provided *wink*)

Previous featured countries:
Puerto Rico

Got more Indian superstitions or sayings from your country? Share below!

Puerto Rican Superstitions: The World’s Superstitions Series

As I wrote about Puerto Rican traditions yesterday, I could not help but remember our superstitions. Then, I thought, whoa, that would be an all-around great series I could start on the blog! So, ladies and gentlemen, today I start a New Series, titled The World’s Superstitions, with the first entry about my home country, Puerto Rican superstitions today!

Puerto Rican superstitions are very likely similar to those of other Latin American countries, as many of them were inherited from the Spanish Conquistadors that “discovered” our lands, Taíno indigenous tribes (among the first settlers of the Caribbean), and the African slaves brought by the Spanish. Together, they make up the rich heritage and of course, the interesting list of superstitions! And without any other preamble, I present to you the oh-so-random list of Puerto Rican superstitions. Enjoy!

Puerto Rican superstitions - Rabbit's foot

Rabbit’s foot, part of Puerto Rican superstitions – picture from Buzzle.com

* It is believed that carrying a rabbit’s foot attracts good luck and keeps the evil eye at bay. Many Puerto Ricans believe there is a certain aura, certain magic about it.

* Like in many other countries, according to Puerto Rican superstitions, the number 13 is feared so much that in the majority of buildings, you will never see a 13th floor. Yes, if you are in an old elevator in Puerto Rico, chances are it would go something like this: “10…11…12…14.” I know, technically, floor 14 is in fact the 13th floor, but they feel as if it is not written, its “bad omen” will not be present.

* And talking about 13th’s bad omen, Tuesday the 13th is in Puerto Rico what Friday the 13th is elsewhere. Furthermore, due to the “Americanization” of the island beginning full-throttle with the signing of Jones Act in 1917 by President Woodrow Wilson (making Puerto Ricans collectively U.S. citizens), these days many Boricuas consider both days to carry bad luck. Ay, as we didn’t have enough bad omens already!

* An odd, and rather comical, is how according to Puerto Rican superstitions, lefties are not allowed in heaven. Sure, not believed so much anymore, but still, it is very unlikely that a Puerto Rican mother will allow her child to be a lefty if she can help it. Yes, that means mom will teach you how to write with your right hand and force you to do so in her sight anyway. This is kind of a blessing in disguise though, as many Puerto Rican “lefties” end up being ambidextrous (able to  use both hands with equal skill). My Puerto Rican friend Claudia is a great example of this! =P

* Black cats are a universal bad omen, no matter how you put it. They bring bad luck, evil, all things dark to your life. Beware.

* There is a little-understood fear of walking under ladders. Apparently, it means really bad luck. To my Puerto Rican mother, I think it equaled death–quite literally. I remember mom yelling at me, freaking out senseless whenever I would walk under a ladder as a kid. It is as if she didn’t trust ladders! Yet, I remember her using them to clean all the time. So, she valued my life, but not hers? Ahh, the ironies of life…

* First showers of the month of May? RUN…TO THE WATER!! Haha indeed, if la primera llovizna de mayo (the first shower of May) is going on, drizzle drizzle! To many Puerto Ricans, this is a great mini-shower of luck =) I still find myself doing this abroad!

* If you have a farm or own animals that live outside, you wake up one morning and one (or several) of them are dead, they must have been eaten by the Chupacabra. Guaranteed.

* And now, we shall go to my favorite of the bunch!! Every New Year’s, right when the clock hits midnight, we throw a big bucket of water outside a window, door or a balcony with joyous energy. Location really depends on where you live. Why? This symbolizes the emptying of the Año Viejo’s (“Old Year”) bad things and a fresh start of the Año Nuevo (“New Year”) with a splash of great luck. I always have this vivid picture of my grandma and mom throwing this big bucket of water, each holding one of the handles, every single year without failure. Always brings a smile to my face and great memories. So I guess it does splashes good omen? 😉

That’s my good list of Puerto Rican superstitions to kick off this new series! On the next post, I shall have a [surprise] country and its nice list of superstitions! If there is a particular country you would like me to research, tell me in your response so I take it into consideration! (Hint: I will probably write about every country I am provided *wink*)

Know more Puerto Rican superstitions? What about some in your country?